METER EXERCISE
Meter can be awfully technical, and you can get confused trying to sort out a spondee from a dactyl. (Those aren't dinosaur names.) To be attuned to meter, though, you should probably concentrate first on the internal "beat" of a poem and add the scientific terms later. A guitar teacher might insist that you tap your feet rather than learn to play with a metronome. The same advice may be applied to reading poetry: understand a poem's metrical logic, then get technical, if necessary.

Scan the meter of the poem below by selecting "/" for stressed syllables and "U" for unstressed syllables in the pull=down menu above each syllable.

"I'm Happiest When Most Away" by Emily Brontë

I'm

hap

pi

est

when

most

a

way

I

can

bear

my

soul

from

its

home

of

clay

On

a

win

dy

night

when

the

moon

is

bright

And

the

eye

can

wan

der

through

worlds

of

light—


When

I

am

not

and

none

be

side—

Nor

earth

nor

sea

nor

cloud

less

sky—

But

on

ly

spi

rit

wan

dering

wide

Through

in

fin

ite

im

mens

it

y.


(This exercise will not be added to your notebook.)

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