"TO HIS COY MISTRESS"

 

CULTURAL CONTEXT FOR "TO HIS COY MISTRESS"

Taken as an allegory of political rebellion, Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” also suggests a rejection of existing conventional beliefs and power structures in seventeenth-century England. Marvell’s ambivalent relationship with the monarchy—one defined by the execution of Charles I, the defining event for Marvell and his contemporaries—illuminates some of the tensions between self and society that emerge in the poem.

To view each document and to respond to the accompanying questions, click on a title below:
> Eikon Basilike (Royal Image)
> John Nalson, “An Allegory of 1649”
> John Milton, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates

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