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Tutorial for Fused Sentences
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What are they?

A fused sentence occurs when two or more independent clauses are joined without a punctuation mark or a coordinating conjunction.

independent clauseindependent clause

A television addict is dependent on television I have suffered this addiction for years.

(Each word group is an independent clause and could stand alone as a separate sentence, but the two independent clauses are not separated in any way.)

How to find them

Many students have difficulty spotting fused sentences in their own writing. As you proofread, check to be sure you haven’t jammed two complete thoughts (independent clauses) together without using proper punctuation. Here are two examples of a Fused Sentence:

independent clauseindependent clause

A resume should be directed to a specific audience it should emphasize the applicant’s potential value to the company.


independent clauseindependent clause

Specialty products are unique items that consumers take time purchasing these items include cars, parachutes, and skis.

How to correct them

There are four ways to correct a fused sentence. Choose the method that best fits your sentence or intended meaning.

  1. Revise by creating two separate sentences. Make sure each independent clause has the appropriate end punctuation mark—a period, a question mark, or (on rare occasions) an exclamation mark.

    A resume should be directed to a specific audience. Itit should emphasize the applicant’s potential value to the company.

    (The run-on is revised by placing a period between the two independent clauses.)

  2. Revise by joining the clauses with a semicolon (;). When the independent clauses are closely connected in meaning, consider joining them with a semicolon. Note that a coordinating conjunction (such as and, or, or but) is not included when you revise with a semicolon.

    Specialty products are unique items that consumers take time purchasing; these items include cars, parachutes, and skis.

    (The run-on is revised by placing a semicolon between the two independent clauses.)

  3. Revise by joining the clauses with a comma and a coordinating conjunction. Two independent clauses can be joined by using both a comma and a coordinating conjunction (and, or, nor, but, for, so, yet). The coordinating conjunction indicates how the two clauses are related.

    Closed-minded people often refuse to recognize opposing views,, and they reject ideas without evaluating them.

  4. Revise by making one clause dependent or by turning one clause into a phrase. You can correct a run-on by adding a subordinating conjunction (such as because or although) to one of the independent clauses, thereby making it a dependent clause. The subordinating conjunction makes the thought incomplete and dependent on the independent clause.

    Because fFacial expressions arevery revealing, they are an important communication tool. they are very revealing.

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